STANHOPE BAYNE-JONES PROFESSORSHIP IN MEDICINE
Established in 1974 by Nannie S. Bayne-Jones in honor of her husband

Image Credit: Alan M. Chesney Archives, Johns Hopkins Medicine STANHOPE BAYNE-JONES, Med 1914, and his wife, NANNIE S. BAYNE-JONES, were longtime supporters of the medical school. They met when Dr. Bayne-Jones was associate professor of bacteriology at Hopkins and she, a Baltimore native, was an X-ray technician at the hospital. After teaching at Hopkins for nine years, Dr. Bayne-Jones became dean of the Yale University Medical School. He rose to the rank of brigadier general in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and was one of the most decorated officers in the U.S. Army Reserve in World War I and World War II. Dr. Bayne-Jones was one of 10 members of the U.S. Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on Smoking and Health which issued the 1964 landmark report that linked smoking to cancer.

 

DAVID L. THOMAS, MD, MPH, is professor of medicine and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins schools of Medicine and Public Health, and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He joined Johns Hopkins in 1993. From 2005 to 2006, he served as director of research at the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda. Dr. Thomas is trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases and cares for patients with chronic viral hepatitis. He also oversees clinical research projects whose aims are focused on understanding the natural history and pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus infection. Liver disease in HIV infected persons is a special area of clinical and research focus. He is the principal investigator on numerous National Institutes of Health grants and the author or co-author of over 140 peer-reviewed publications and holds a U.S. patent. Dr. Thomas serves on numerous editorial and advisory boards and has won international recognition for his academic accomplishments.