SHERLOCK HIBBS PROFESSORSHIP IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE
Established in June 2006 by the estate of Sherlock Hibbs

SHERLOCK HIBBS was born in Missouri in 1904, son of a successful dry goods merchant, graduated from the University of Missouri where he excelled in economics, then joined Morgan Guaranty Trust Company on Wall Street in New York City. The day after Pearl Harbor, Mr. Hibbs enlisted in the Navy, and participated in military actions in southern France, the Philippines, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, serving as naval liaison with Marines on the ground. He left active service in late 1945 as a commander, but remained in the Naval Reserve from which he finally retired at the rank of captain. In 1946 he resumed his financial career as a general partner in the investment banking firm Kidder, Peabody and Company, leading the New England operation in Boston. He retired from Kidder, Peabody in 1974, and moved with his wife, Margaret, to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, to manage a nearby orange grove established by his father. Mrs. Hibbs passed away in 1997 and Mr. Hibbs, at the age of 98, died in 2002.

 

THEODORE M. BAYLESS, the Emeritus Sherlock Hibbs Professor of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, is professor of medicine and past director of the Meyerhoff Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Bayless was a postoctoral fellow in gastroenterology at Hopkins hospital in 1960-62 and joined the faculty in 1964. He co-founded Hopkins' "Human Pathophysiology" course in 1977 and coordinated the basic medical clerkship and curriculum for many years as well as serving as co-director of the continuing medical education course "Topics in Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases." Dr. Bayless was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 1975. In 1987 he received the first Distinguished Educator Award from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). In 2004 the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association awarded him their Excellence in Teaching Award and, in the same yar, the AGA presented him with their Distinguished Clinician Award. His influence extends beyond Hopkins--he has edited 11 books for practicing physicians and developed audio-visual teaching materials now used in more than 100 medical schools.