BO JUNG AND SOON YOUNG KIM PROFESSORSHIP OF EAST ASIAN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Established in 2003 by Dr. Dong-Won Kim in honor of his parents

DONG-WON KIM has contributed to the Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences through his scholarship, his philanthropy, and his academic collaborations, working to unite the histories of science in the East and West in the modern period in the same spirit as the esteemed academic Joseph Needham did for China and the West. In 2003, Dr. Kim established the Bo Jung and Soon Young Kim Professorship of East Asian Science and Technology in honor of his parents. Dr. Kim’s support has helped to make Johns Hopkins one of the world's leading centers for the historical study of modern East Asian science and technology.

Dr. Kim earned his BS in computer science and statistics at Seoul National University. He did his graduate work at Harvard University, where he was awarded an MA in 1988 and a PhD in 1991 from the Department of the History of Science. He has served as a visiting professor at the University of Cambridge, Harvard University, Needham Research Institute in Cambridge, and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology. Dr. Kim currently serves as a visiting professor in the Department of the History of Science and Technology at The Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. Through his research and publications, Dr. Kim has enhanced the academic prestige of Johns Hopkins.

 

YULIA FRUMER, the Bo Jung and Soon Young Kim Professor of East Asian Science and Technology, is a historian focusing on development of sciences and technologies in East Asia during the 19th century. She is particularly interested in processes of cross-cultural scientific and technological exchange, both within the broad East Asian region and between East Asian cultures and the West. Her current research projects deal with the history of Japanese astronomical timekeeping, meteorology and navigation technologies. Yulia Frumer finished her PhD in the Program in History of Science at Princeton University, and she spent the 2012-2013 academic year at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin.