KRIEGER - EISENHOWER PROFESSORSHIP
Established in 1993 by Zanvyl Krieger in honor of Milton S. Eisenhower

Image Credit: Ferdinand Hamburger Jr. Archives, Johns Hopkins University, Milton S. Eisenhower Library MILTON S. EISENHOWER, widely regarded as a leader of great vision, holds the distinction of having served two nonconsecutive terms as president of The Johns Hopkins University. After serving from 1956 to 1967--a period in which the university's income tripled and the endowment doubled--he retired and was named president emeritus. During his tenure, the medical institutions underwent major expansion and a new library and athletic center were added at Homewood. He returned to the presidency again, in 1971-72, and is credited with restoring a sense of unity to the university. The youngest brother of U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Milton Eisenhower died in 1985.

 

ZANVYL KRIEGER, A&S 1928, celebrated his close friendship with the late university President Emeritus Milton S. Eisenhower by providing for the eventual creation of the Krieger-Eisenhower professorships--part of his record-setting 1992 endowment gift to the School of Arts and Sciences, which was named in his honor in 1995. Mr. Krieger changed the face of Baltimore through his efforts to revitalize the downtown area, his leadership in bringing professional sports teams back to his hometown, and his philanthropic and civic leadership. Mr. Krieger was an attorney and co-founded U.S. Surgical, which developed surgical staples and other innovations. At Hopkins, he funded the Krieger Professorship in Pediatric Ophthalmology, made generous gifts to the Wilmer Eye Institute's Zanvyl Krieger Children's Eye Center, which was named in his honor in 1998, and created the Krieger Professorship in Children's Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Mr. Krieger died in 2000.

 

GEORGE D. ROSE is a professor in the Thomas C. Jenkins Department of Biophysics, and holds joint appointments in biology, and biophysics and biophysical chemistry. He joined the Hopkins faculty in 1994 and chaired the Department of Biophysics from 2004 to 2007. He is a member of the Hopkins' Institute for Biophysical Research.

Dr. Rose has transformed the field's understanding of how proteins fold, and has led the way in determining the essential role that conformational entropy plays in determining the structure and function of all proteins. He is credited with the fundamental insight that proteins fold hierarchically.

In 2005, Dr. Rose was elected as a fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science.